A new documentary produced by Louis Theroux exploring the infamous White House Farm murders will premier tonight.

The Bambers: Murder At The Farm will be shown on Sky Crime and NOW on at 9pm.

The documentary series is looking into Jeremy Bamber’s guilt. 

Bamber, now 60, was jailed for life after being convicted of murdering five members of his family at White House Farm in Tolleshunt D’Arcy, in 1985.

His adoptive parents Nevill and June, both 61, his sister Sheila Caffell, 26, and her six-year-old twins Daniel and Nicholas all died in the massacre and Bamber was convicted by a split jury.

However, he has always protested his innocence saying Sheila killed the family before turning the gun on herself.

Read more >> Supporters of killer Jeremy Bamber claim new alibi evidence could see him freed

He has had two appeals heard but both have been rejected and he is now pushing for a third appeal at the High Court.

Mr Theroux has examined the case for a new four-part documentary.

Theroux, who executive produced the documentary, said: “What really amazed me was how bizarre almost every version of the story is, and yet one of them, quite evidently, must be true.

Maldon and Burnham Standard: A smiling Jeremy Bamber leaves Maldon Police station after arrest. Picture: PA Photo/Anglia Press Agency/Archived via SWpix.com.A smiling Jeremy Bamber leaves Maldon Police station after arrest. Picture: PA Photo/Anglia Press Agency/Archived via SWpix.com.

“Sheila did have a history of serious mental illness and had expressed confused ideations about possibly doing physical harm to people.

“And at the same time, to believe that she did it, you’d have to believe that in her psychosis she did an almost executioner-style job. Every one of the bullets, there were 20-something shots, hit its target.”

Theroux and his team gained access to unheard tapes for the new series which features first-hand testimony and evidential footage.

This includes recordings of Bamber speaking to a journalist while in prison.

Read more >> Policeman wrongfully imprisoned aims to free convicted killer Jeremy Bamber

“There are various strange, anomalous factors that mean there are these two camps: the people who believe passionately that Bamber did it, and the people who believe passionately that he didn’t do it,” added Mr Theroux.

Joined by director Lottie Gammon, who previously worked with Theroux on The Night in Question — a 2019 documentary focusing on college students accused of sexual assault, The Bambers: Murder At The Farm continues the decidedly dark theme.

Maldon and Burnham Standard: Jeremy Bamber in handcuffs, escorted by police. Picture: PA Photo/Anglia Press Agency/Archived via SWpix.comJeremy Bamber in handcuffs, escorted by police. Picture: PA Photo/Anglia Press Agency/Archived via SWpix.com

“There are various strange, anomalous factors that mean there are these two camps: the people who believe passionately that he (Bamber) did it, and the people who believe passionately that he didn’t do it,” says Theroux.

“This is a really complicated four-episode story,” agrees Gammon. “Often with a series, each series has a different story and that’s kind of how all series used to be. Now, we’re in this world of doing single narrative, which as Louis was saying, is kind of novelistic and it takes a lot of brains to get that right.”

Describing her and Theroux’s working partnership as a “good creative collaboration”, Gammon found herself in a rather unique position when filming for the project first commenced.

“I was actually heavily pregnant,” says the director with a laugh. “It was quite a weird combination, having this really heavy story and childbirth and being in the middle of a plague. So yes, it’s been a really weird year.”

The Bambers: Murder At The Farm is one of the first projects to emerge from the newly formed Mindhouse Production house.