More than 30 Braintree pupils given lower GCSE English mark due to clerical error

Headteacher Trevor Lawn

Headteacher Trevor Lawn

First published in North Essex by , Reporter

More than 30 pupils have been given a lower mark in their GCSE in English due to a clerical error by the exam board.

Thirty-one pupils studying at Alec Hunter Academy in Stubbs Lane, Braintree, have been awarded no marks for an assessment they sat in Year 10.

A statement sent to the Times by headteacher Trevor Lawn read: “The headline figure of 5+ A*-C grades including English and maths is unclear at present.

“This is due to the fact that the school has identified a clerical error in English language by the AQA Exam Board, resulting in 31 students being awarded no marks for Controlled Assessment carried forward from Year 10."

A spokesman for the AQA exam board said: "When we sent these 31 students their results we hadn’t included their coursework marks, so the results weren’t right.

"We’re really sorry that this happened and will review our processes to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”

See this week's Braintree and Witham Times for the full story.

Comments (6)

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5:20pm Thu 28 Aug 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

This is a terribly written report.

I don’t know about the students concerned, but the reporter certainly goes to the bottom of the class that’s for sure!

No matter how many times I read this I simply cannot fathom out whether we are being told that the students were given a lower mark than they should have received in the first instance - or whether perhaps their initial mark has been retrospectively downgraded.

It’s about a clear as mud to me. Can anyone else make sense of it?
This is a terribly written report. I don’t know about the students concerned, but the reporter certainly goes to the bottom of the class that’s for sure! No matter how many times I read this I simply cannot fathom out whether we are being told that the students were given a lower mark than they should have received in the first instance - or whether perhaps their initial mark has been retrospectively downgraded. It’s about a clear as mud to me. Can anyone else make sense of it? OMPITA [Intl]
  • Score: 3

7:48pm Thu 28 Aug 14

pierre-pierre says...

clear to me, do you want some new glasses?

Thirty-one pupils studying at Alec Hunter Academy in Stubbs Lane, Braintree, have been awarded no marks for an assessment they sat in Year 10.

A statement sent to the Times by headteacher Trevor Lawn read: “The headline figure of 5+ A*-C grades including English and maths is unclear at present.

“This is due to the fact that the school has identified a clerical error in English language by the AQA Exam Board, resulting in 31 students being awarded no marks for Controlled Assessment carried forward from Year 10."

A spokesman for the AQA exam board said: "When we sent these 31 students their results we hadn’t included their coursework marks, so the results weren’t right.

"We’re really sorry that this happened and will review our processes to make sure it doesn’t happen again.”
clear to me, do you want some new glasses? Thirty-one pupils studying at Alec Hunter Academy in Stubbs Lane, Braintree, have been awarded no marks for an assessment they sat in Year 10. A statement sent to the Times by headteacher Trevor Lawn read: “The headline figure of 5+ A*-C grades including English and maths is unclear at present. “This is due to the fact that the school has identified a clerical error in English language by the AQA Exam Board, resulting in 31 students being awarded no marks for Controlled Assessment carried forward from Year 10." A spokesman for the AQA exam board said: "When we sent these 31 students their results we hadn’t included their coursework marks, so the results weren’t right. "We’re really sorry that this happened and will review our processes to make sure it doesn’t happen again.” pierre-pierre
  • Score: -3

9:49pm Thu 28 Aug 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Hey, Frenchie - I see you've been boning up and honing your cut-and-paste skills! Well done - nice job, too, if I may say so. Of course one can always parrot what's in Wikipedia, too, but anyone worth their salt realises how much that's worth. And it ain't worth a parrot's willy! About as much use as a chocolate teapot, in fact. Like this "article" which is confused at best. So, thank for reinforcing the confusion by repeating it.
Hey, Frenchie - I see you've been boning up and honing your cut-and-paste skills! Well done - nice job, too, if I may say so. Of course one can always parrot what's in Wikipedia, too, but anyone worth their salt realises how much that's worth. And it ain't worth a parrot's willy! About as much use as a chocolate teapot, in fact. Like this "article" which is confused at best. So, thank for reinforcing the confusion by repeating it. /@|_|@\
  • Score: 3

9:59am Fri 29 Aug 14

OMPITA [Intl] says...

Well /@|_|@\, I must say you really do have a way of introducing the most unexpected and intriguing digressions from the fundamental subject matter.

I had no idea whatsoever that by the time I hit my eighth cup of coffee this morning I would be contemplating the mystery surrounding the existence (or otherwise?) of Parrots’ Willies. For the whole of my sad and sheltered life I have never had any occasion to consider matters concerning parrots’ tackle (if I may be permitted to use such a vulgar street vernacular). Now I find my concentration on today’s more mundane matters interrupted by this burning question – do Parrots actually have Willies?

Clearly from what you say you will not approve of my having consulted Wikipedia - but on the whole I generally find it to be quite informative. Indeed it has a great tome on the subject of parrots and I thought therefore that a quick scan through the mass of information therein would soon lead me to the answer.

Au contrair, mon ami!

For some unknown reason - notwithstanding that it deals with just about every other imaginable fact concerning parrots - it ever so discretely skirts around the issue of P-----s W-----s. I can only imagine that there might be some sort of automatic Protective Programme controlling what one can read before the evening Watershed. Maybe I should try again after nine-o-clock tonight. I shall have to grovel to Matron to ask if I can stay up specially.

In the meantime I’m afraid that I must just have to accept what Wikepedia tells me at this time of day about the matter of Parrots’ Rumpy Pumpy.

Actually it’s all rather twee.

It seems that parrots undergo a period of courtship before actually ‘getting it together’, and once they do so they stay together for life (no sneaky ‘extra-marital’ affairs would you believe). Mummy Parrot generally stays at home to look after the kids whilst Daddy Parrot ‘brings home the bacon every day’.

It might all seem a bit ‘Janet and John’ but on the other hand perhaps they could teach us one or two old fashioned values we seem to have forgotten.

Who’s a Pretty Boy Then?
Well /@|_|@\, I must say you really do have a way of introducing the most unexpected and intriguing digressions from the fundamental subject matter. I had no idea whatsoever that by the time I hit my eighth cup of coffee this morning I would be contemplating the mystery surrounding the existence (or otherwise?) of Parrots’ Willies. For the whole of my sad and sheltered life I have never had any occasion to consider matters concerning parrots’ tackle (if I may be permitted to use such a vulgar street vernacular). Now I find my concentration on today’s more mundane matters interrupted by this burning question – do Parrots actually have Willies? Clearly from what you say you will not approve of my having consulted Wikipedia - but on the whole I generally find it to be quite informative. Indeed it has a great tome on the subject of parrots and I thought therefore that a quick scan through the mass of information therein would soon lead me to the answer. Au contrair, mon ami! For some unknown reason - notwithstanding that it deals with just about every other imaginable fact concerning parrots - it ever so discretely skirts around the issue of P-----s W-----s. I can only imagine that there might be some sort of automatic Protective Programme controlling what one can read before the evening Watershed. Maybe I should try again after nine-o-clock tonight. I shall have to grovel to Matron to ask if I can stay up specially. In the meantime I’m afraid that I must just have to accept what Wikepedia tells me at this time of day about the matter of Parrots’ Rumpy Pumpy. Actually it’s all rather twee. It seems that parrots undergo a period of courtship before actually ‘getting it together’, and once they do so they stay together for life (no sneaky ‘extra-marital’ affairs would you believe). Mummy Parrot generally stays at home to look after the kids whilst Daddy Parrot ‘brings home the bacon every day’. It might all seem a bit ‘Janet and John’ but on the other hand perhaps they could teach us one or two old fashioned values we seem to have forgotten. Who’s a Pretty Boy Then? OMPITA [Intl]
  • Score: 4

3:33pm Fri 29 Aug 14

/@|_|@\ says...

Priceless!
Priceless! /@|_|@\
  • Score: 2

11:16pm Sat 30 Aug 14

bridportresident says...

Very predictable! It has become a very regular occurrence in August that Alec Hunter chooses not to publish GSCE results as every year there seems to be a problem with the grades.

Don't suppose the head and staff were dancing around to "Happy" when this years results came in!

Might be time to "Mow the Lawn".
Very predictable! It has become a very regular occurrence in August that Alec Hunter chooses not to publish GSCE results as every year there seems to be a problem with the grades. Don't suppose the head and staff were dancing around to "Happy" when this years results came in! Might be time to "Mow the Lawn". bridportresident
  • Score: 2

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