Maldon: I smoked cannabis and didn't like it, says MP

Maldon and Burnham Standard: Picture: One of the many drug factories uncovered by police. Picture: One of the many drug factories uncovered by police.

Maldon's MP has admitted trying cannabis, but is concerned about radical suggestions to look at relaxing drug laws.
 

John Whittingdale told the Standard he had tried cannabis on one occasion while at university, but “didn’t like it” and has never touched it since.
 

He has now spoken of his concerns after a report this week by the home affairs select committee suggested it may be time to consider decriminalising illegal drugs - a move which David Cameron has rejected.
 

Father-of-two Mr Whittingdale said: “I would have profound reservations about legalising drugs."

 

See the Standard for more.

Comments (27)

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11:26am Wed 12 Dec 12

Babs Stanley says...

We need to stop this stupid and unwinnable war against cannabis. It is causing far more harm to our communities than it prevents. If we had a properly regulated system of production and supply we'd have no more illegal cannabis farms, instead we'd have thousands of new jobs. We'd have no more dealers on the streets. Cannabis would be available to adults only through licensed outlets and we'd have some control over the THC and CBD content.

Doctors would be able to prescribe one of the most effective medicines that has no serious side effects at all. At the moment the government has given GW Pharmaceuticals an illegal monopoly on cannabis so they make millions out of a medicine that you can grow in your greenhouse for virtually nothing.

If we introduced a legally regulated system we would solve nearly all the problems around cannabis. Science proves how much safer it is than tobacco, alcohol, prescription medicines and all other recreational drugs. If anyone does have a problem with it they could get help without having to confess to a crime.

CLEAR published independent, expert research last year which shows that a tax and regulate policy on cannabis would produce a net gain to the UK economy of up to £9.3 billion per annum.

It is a scandal that our government, our judges, our courts, our police and our newspapers keep misleading us about cannabis. Find out the truth for yourself and wake up to the lies you have been told.
We need to stop this stupid and unwinnable war against cannabis. It is causing far more harm to our communities than it prevents. If we had a properly regulated system of production and supply we'd have no more illegal cannabis farms, instead we'd have thousands of new jobs. We'd have no more dealers on the streets. Cannabis would be available to adults only through licensed outlets and we'd have some control over the THC and CBD content. Doctors would be able to prescribe one of the most effective medicines that has no serious side effects at all. At the moment the government has given GW Pharmaceuticals an illegal monopoly on cannabis so they make millions out of a medicine that you can grow in your greenhouse for virtually nothing. If we introduced a legally regulated system we would solve nearly all the problems around cannabis. Science proves how much safer it is than tobacco, alcohol, prescription medicines and all other recreational drugs. If anyone does have a problem with it they could get help without having to confess to a crime. CLEAR published independent, expert research last year which shows that a tax and regulate policy on cannabis would produce a net gain to the UK economy of up to £9.3 billion per annum. It is a scandal that our government, our judges, our courts, our police and our newspapers keep misleading us about cannabis. Find out the truth for yourself and wake up to the lies you have been told. Babs Stanley
  • Score: 0

11:30am Wed 12 Dec 12

cavillas says...

I smoked a cigarette once and didn't like it so never did it again. There are many silly laws that are unenforceable. Prostitution is one such. It should be made legal and regulated, this would lessen crime associated with it.
I smoked a cigarette once and didn't like it so never did it again. There are many silly laws that are unenforceable. Prostitution is one such. It should be made legal and regulated, this would lessen crime associated with it. cavillas
  • Score: 0

11:36am Wed 12 Dec 12

Pawel_Si says...

I once tried McDonalds and i didn't like it. I don't think it should be legal...
I once tried McDonalds and i didn't like it. I don't think it should be legal... Pawel_Si
  • Score: 0

11:42am Wed 12 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

Ok, he admitted committing a crime and supports people getting criminal records and going to jail for committing the same crime. The law states that you can get seven whole years in jail for possession of cannabis, and Mr Whittingdale, who has the power to influence the law, has admitted smoking cannabis and does not support its legalisation. As such, he should support the idea of himself getting a seven-year custodial sentence, lest he be a hypocrite.
Ok, he admitted committing a crime and supports people getting criminal records and going to jail for committing the same crime. The law states that you can get seven whole years in jail for possession of cannabis, and Mr Whittingdale, who has the power to influence the law, has admitted smoking cannabis and does not support its legalisation. As such, he should support the idea of himself getting a seven-year custodial sentence, lest he be a hypocrite. Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

11:43am Wed 12 Dec 12

moreachesandpains says...

I smoked cannabis when I was a student. Didn't bother me one way or the other. But after many years I now, very successfully, use it for medical reasons. It helps with arthritic pain, insomnia, anxiety and hypertension (and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh). I also tried champagne once and thought it revolting but I wouldn't want to legislate against others enjoying it. Alcohol is their free choice, Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial but I'm labelled a criminal. Why?
I smoked cannabis when I was a student. Didn't bother me one way or the other. But after many years I now, very successfully, use it for medical reasons. It helps with arthritic pain, insomnia, anxiety and hypertension (and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh). I also tried champagne once and thought it revolting but I wouldn't want to legislate against others enjoying it. Alcohol is their free choice, Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial but I'm labelled a criminal. Why? moreachesandpains
  • Score: 0

11:59am Wed 12 Dec 12

JustExtreme says...

Just because you don't like it doesn't give you license to impose your preference upon others by force and make it more dangerous to obtain and use.
Just because you don't like it doesn't give you license to impose your preference upon others by force and make it more dangerous to obtain and use. JustExtreme
  • Score: 0

12:22pm Wed 12 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial"

In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse".

Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems.
"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial" In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse". Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

12:24pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Babs Stanley says...

There Abouts wrote:
"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial"

In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse".

Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems.
"Cannabis is safe for over-18 brains"

Professor Terrie Moffit, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London. August 2012
[quote][p][bold]There Abouts[/bold] wrote: "Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial" In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse". Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems.[/p][/quote]"Cannabis is safe for over-18 brains" Professor Terrie Moffit, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London. August 2012 Babs Stanley
  • Score: 0

12:30pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Joel Dalais says...

I didn't like alcohol when I first tasted that, lets ban all of that shall we?

Stupid MP.
I didn't like alcohol when I first tasted that, lets ban all of that shall we? Stupid MP. Joel Dalais
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Joel Dalais says...

moreachesandpains wrote:
I smoked cannabis when I was a student. Didn't bother me one way or the other. But after many years I now, very successfully, use it for medical reasons. It helps with arthritic pain, insomnia, anxiety and hypertension (and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh). I also tried champagne once and thought it revolting but I wouldn't want to legislate against others enjoying it. Alcohol is their free choice, Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial but I'm labelled a criminal. Why?
"(and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh)"

Wait, what?? you laughed with Cannabis?! Omgosh!

Quick lock this person up and throw away the keys, lets makes sure he/she gets addicted to A Class in the drug dealers goldmine of a prison! You can't laugh, oh noes, that's just... wrong!

/sarcasm off
[quote][p][bold]moreachesandpains[/bold] wrote: I smoked cannabis when I was a student. Didn't bother me one way or the other. But after many years I now, very successfully, use it for medical reasons. It helps with arthritic pain, insomnia, anxiety and hypertension (and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh). I also tried champagne once and thought it revolting but I wouldn't want to legislate against others enjoying it. Alcohol is their free choice, Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial but I'm labelled a criminal. Why?[/p][/quote]"(and, sin of sins, it makes me laugh)" Wait, what?? you laughed with Cannabis?! Omgosh! Quick lock this person up and throw away the keys, lets makes sure he/she gets addicted to A Class in the drug dealers goldmine of a prison! You can't laugh, oh noes, that's just... wrong! /sarcasm off Joel Dalais
  • Score: 0

12:39pm Wed 12 Dec 12

moreachesandpains says...

There Abouts wrote:
"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial"

In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse".

Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems.
Well it may have had that effect on you ThereAbouts and you may be one of the 0.03% of the population who has this susceptibility. But the vast majority of users like myself have only positive results. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for government approved drugs like alcohol or coffee or nicotine. Of course, if you have not tried cannabis, you are just spouting uninformed opinion probably gleaned from the likes of the daily mail. You only have to visit your local A&E to see the results of drug abuse - and you will find that cannabis does not feature unless it has been mixed with the legal poison alcohol which does feature above all other problematic drug use. I also object to being referred to as a dope. I have worked for many years, paid tax, brought up a large family, bought a house, and never harmed anyone - not bad for a dope eh?
[quote][p][bold]There Abouts[/bold] wrote: "Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial" In the past it was referred to as dope and with good reason cos that's what you became or more correctly "Cannabis use can cause drug-induced psychosis, trigger the first episode of a psychotic illness, or make a pre-existing psychotic illness worse". Just something else to add to an already overburdened health service and social structure. We have enough self inflicted health and social problems.[/p][/quote]Well it may have had that effect on you ThereAbouts and you may be one of the 0.03% of the population who has this susceptibility. But the vast majority of users like myself have only positive results. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for government approved drugs like alcohol or coffee or nicotine. Of course, if you have not tried cannabis, you are just spouting uninformed opinion probably gleaned from the likes of the daily mail. You only have to visit your local A&E to see the results of drug abuse - and you will find that cannabis does not feature unless it has been mixed with the legal poison alcohol which does feature above all other problematic drug use. I also object to being referred to as a dope. I have worked for many years, paid tax, brought up a large family, bought a house, and never harmed anyone - not bad for a dope eh? moreachesandpains
  • Score: 0

1:34pm Wed 12 Dec 12

Alan-_Hobday says...

Pimpmasterkdogg wrote:
Ok, he admitted committing a crime and supports people getting criminal records and going to jail for committing the same crime. The law states that you can get seven whole years in jail for possession of cannabis, and Mr Whittingdale, who has the power to influence the law, has admitted smoking cannabis and does not support its legalisation. As such, he should support the idea of himself getting a seven-year custodial sentence, lest he be a hypocrite.
A very good observation Pimpmasterkdogg.

He should be jailed as soon as possible, he will be able to make lots of friends in prison, many of whom will no doubt offer him heroin as inside prison is the easiest place to obtain it.
It is not uncommon for innocent non-problematical cannabis users to be imprisoned and then get hooked on heroin whilst inside, due to the pressures applied to them by other prisoners.
[quote][p][bold]Pimpmasterkdogg[/bold] wrote: Ok, he admitted committing a crime and supports people getting criminal records and going to jail for committing the same crime. The law states that you can get seven whole years in jail for possession of cannabis, and Mr Whittingdale, who has the power to influence the law, has admitted smoking cannabis and does not support its legalisation. As such, he should support the idea of himself getting a seven-year custodial sentence, lest he be a hypocrite.[/p][/quote]A very good observation Pimpmasterkdogg. He should be jailed as soon as possible, he will be able to make lots of friends in prison, many of whom will no doubt offer him heroin as inside prison is the easiest place to obtain it. It is not uncommon for innocent non-problematical cannabis users to be imprisoned and then get hooked on heroin whilst inside, due to the pressures applied to them by other prisoners. Alan-_Hobday
  • Score: 0

7:59pm Wed 12 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

moreachesandpains says...

"I also object to being referred to as a dope."

You may object but that's what you are, as I said it was referred to as dope for a good reason.
moreachesandpains says... "I also object to being referred to as a dope." You may object but that's what you are, as I said it was referred to as dope for a good reason. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

8:19pm Wed 12 Dec 12

NR23Derek says...

What is it about MP's? They all seem to be people who try cannabis and don't like it. Either they are very odd, or they tell porkies.

But this one admits to having broke the law and says he agrees with people being given a criminal record for using cannabis, therefore he should live by his own standards and accept the criminal record he wishes to impose on others.

Sorry, but people like this annoy me, they make my skin creep frankly.
What is it about MP's? They all seem to be people who try cannabis and don't like it. Either they are very odd, or they tell porkies. But this one admits to having broke the law and says he agrees with people being given a criminal record for using cannabis, therefore he should live by his own standards and accept the criminal record he wishes to impose on others. Sorry, but people like this annoy me, they make my skin creep frankly. NR23Derek
  • Score: 0

12:58am Thu 13 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial"

All the dope advocates remind me of the tobacco apologists of a few years ago. And you want to legalise it, give me a break. And who pays for the health and social costs of the dope and tobacco users, the obese, etc, etc? the good ol' taxpayer.

Google 'the health and social impacts of cannabis use'

Here's a few to be going on with:

• feel unusually well and happy
• do or say things which you normally wouldn't, such as risk-taking behaviour like unsafe sex or dangerous driving
• talk and laugh more than usual
• experience anxiety and paranoia
• have bad balance and coordination
• feel drowsy
• find it hard to concentrate
• have problems remembering things
• feel hungry
• experience asthmatic symptoms or have trouble breathing if you smoke cannabis
• have a faster heart rate
• have dry, red eyes
• have a dry mouth and throat
• focus on one particular thing and ignore all other things.
• feel confused
• vomit
• be restless
• experience change in your perception of time, sound, sight, touch and distance
• feel excited
• see or hear things which are not there (hallucinations)
• feel anxious or panicky
• 'black out'
• feel distant or separate from reality.
• remembering things
• thinking clearly
• movement
• ability to do things like drive or operate machines.

If you take cannabis regularly over a long period of time then you may experience the following health problems:

• dependence
• increased risk of getting bronchitis, lung cancer and other diseases of the respiratory system
• decreased motivation
• decreased concentration, memory and ability to learn new things
• decreased sex drive
• depression
• psychological effects - this is more likely if the person already has a schizophrenic condition or has a pre-disposition to schizophrenia which can be triggered by cannabis use.

Physical and psychological dependency on cannabis can develop. This means that you may experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop or suddenly cut down as well as tolerance, meaning you need more of the drug to experience the same effects.

Cannabis withdrawal symptoms usually consist of flu-like symptoms such as:

• headaches
• nausea
• irritation
• depression
• trouble sleeping and strange dreams
• anxiety
• poor appetite
• restlessness.
"Cannabis is mine and mine is far, far safer and more beneficial" All the dope advocates remind me of the tobacco apologists of a few years ago. And you want to legalise it, give me a break. And who pays for the health and social costs of the dope and tobacco users, the obese, etc, etc? the good ol' taxpayer. Google 'the health and social impacts of cannabis use' Here's a few to be going on with: • feel unusually well and happy • do or say things which you normally wouldn't, such as risk-taking behaviour like unsafe sex or dangerous driving • talk and laugh more than usual • experience anxiety and paranoia • have bad balance and coordination • feel drowsy • find it hard to concentrate • have problems remembering things • feel hungry • experience asthmatic symptoms or have trouble breathing if you smoke cannabis • have a faster heart rate • have dry, red eyes • have a dry mouth and throat • focus on one particular thing and ignore all other things. • feel confused • vomit • be restless • experience change in your perception of time, sound, sight, touch and distance • feel excited • see or hear things which are not there (hallucinations) • feel anxious or panicky • 'black out' • feel distant or separate from reality. • remembering things • thinking clearly • movement • ability to do things like drive or operate machines. If you take cannabis regularly over a long period of time then you may experience the following health problems: • dependence • increased risk of getting bronchitis, lung cancer and other diseases of the respiratory system • decreased motivation • decreased concentration, memory and ability to learn new things • decreased sex drive • depression • psychological effects - this is more likely if the person already has a schizophrenic condition or has a pre-disposition to schizophrenia which can be triggered by cannabis use. Physical and psychological dependency on cannabis can develop. This means that you may experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop or suddenly cut down as well as tolerance, meaning you need more of the drug to experience the same effects. Cannabis withdrawal symptoms usually consist of flu-like symptoms such as: • headaches • nausea • irritation • depression • trouble sleeping and strange dreams • anxiety • poor appetite • restlessness. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

9:30am Thu 13 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

There Abouts, if there were taxes and duties on cannabis that more than covered the healthcare costs to the state that were caused by its consumption, in much the same way as tobacco, so it was actually a net benefit to the Exchequer, would you have any problem with its legalisation?
There Abouts, if there were taxes and duties on cannabis that more than covered the healthcare costs to the state that were caused by its consumption, in much the same way as tobacco, so it was actually a net benefit to the Exchequer, would you have any problem with its legalisation? Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

11:30am Thu 13 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

Oh yeah, worth pointing out that we taxpayers already pay for the NHS treatment of pot-smokers, but because it is illegal, we also pay for law enforcement and prison sentences for them. So not only are we missing out on taxing a multi-billion crop, we're also losing billions of pounds because of law enforcement against it.

Food for thought There Abouts, since you said, "And who pays for the health and social costs of the dope and tobacco users, the obese, etc, etc? the good ol' taxpayer." If 'the good ol' taxpayer' thinks he's saving money by making cannabis illegal, he's dumber than I gave him credit for.
Oh yeah, worth pointing out that we taxpayers already pay for the NHS treatment of pot-smokers, but because it is illegal, we also pay for law enforcement and prison sentences for them. So not only are we missing out on taxing a multi-billion crop, we're also losing billions of pounds because of law enforcement against it. Food for thought There Abouts, since you said, "And who pays for the health and social costs of the dope and tobacco users, the obese, etc, etc? the good ol' taxpayer." If 'the good ol' taxpayer' thinks he's saving money by making cannabis illegal, he's dumber than I gave him credit for. Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Thu 13 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

"he's dumber than I gave him credit for"

He, whoever he is, ain't the only one.

Do your research before making wild exaggerations regarding healthcare/social costs etc.
"he's dumber than I gave him credit for" He, whoever he is, ain't the only one. Do your research before making wild exaggerations regarding healthcare/social costs etc. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

10:14pm Thu 13 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

You didn't answer my question. If the taxes the state recouped from cannabis covered the costs to the state from its consumption, would you support its legalisation? Or do you still want young people to go to jail for smoking a joint for some deeper reason?
You didn't answer my question. If the taxes the state recouped from cannabis covered the costs to the state from its consumption, would you support its legalisation? Or do you still want young people to go to jail for smoking a joint for some deeper reason? Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

1:12am Fri 14 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

Both superfluous questions because, the State could never recoup the taxes to cover the social, health and other costs from cannabis consumption, just as it can't from tobacco consumption, excess food consumption, etc,etc.

No young person has gone to jail for smoking "a joint". I don't understand where you're coming from regarding the "deeper reason" bit.

As I said, do your research.
Both superfluous questions because, the State could never recoup the taxes to cover the social, health and other costs from cannabis consumption, just as it can't from tobacco consumption, excess food consumption, etc,etc. No young person has gone to jail for smoking "a joint". I don't understand where you're coming from regarding the "deeper reason" bit. As I said, do your research. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

10:20am Fri 14 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

Ok, point me to something that indicates otherwise. Here's a number of studies revealing that tobacco smokers pay their way through taxes:
http://velvetgloveir
onfist.blogspot.co.u
k/2010/03/do-smokers
-pay-their-way.html

On cannabis:

"On the contrary, legalizing marijuana would not only save taxpayers billions of dollars a year in unnecessary costs, but it would also jumpstart the economy to the tune of $100 billion a year or more, say some economists." US source:
http://www.naturalne
ws.com/035654_mariju
ana_decriminalizatio
n_economists.html
http://www.guardian.
co.uk/uk/2003/feb/02
/drugsandalcohol.ben
summerskill
Cannabis economy brings in £11bn

Research? I just googled 'cannabis economy' and EVERYTHING points to legalisation bringing in money. Where's your research?
Ok, point me to something that indicates otherwise. Here's a number of studies revealing that tobacco smokers pay their way through taxes: http://velvetgloveir onfist.blogspot.co.u k/2010/03/do-smokers -pay-their-way.html On cannabis: "On the contrary, legalizing marijuana would not only save taxpayers billions of dollars a year in unnecessary costs, but it would also jumpstart the economy to the tune of $100 billion a year or more, say some economists." US source: http://www.naturalne ws.com/035654_mariju ana_decriminalizatio n_economists.html http://www.guardian. co.uk/uk/2003/feb/02 /drugsandalcohol.ben summerskill Cannabis economy brings in £11bn Research? I just googled 'cannabis economy' and EVERYTHING points to legalisation bringing in money. Where's your research? Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

7:28pm Fri 14 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

From Wikipedia: "Both advocates and opponents of the drug are able to call upon numerous scientific studies supporting their respective positions", add to that economic, health and social studies.

As I said, do your research.
From Wikipedia: "Both advocates and opponents of the drug are able to call upon numerous scientific studies supporting their respective positions", add to that economic, health and social studies. As I said, do your research. There Abouts
  • Score: 0

7:34pm Fri 14 Dec 12

Babs Stanley says...

Taxing the UK Cannabis Market

Expert, independent study.

http://www.clear-uk.
org/wp-content/uploa
ds/2011/09/TaxUKCan.
pdf
Taxing the UK Cannabis Market Expert, independent study. http://www.clear-uk. org/wp-content/uploa ds/2011/09/TaxUKCan. pdf Babs Stanley
  • Score: 0

2:32pm Sat 15 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

Your research is a line from Wikipedia? Anyway, I've pointed out that a reasonable person could believe it is possible to cover health and social costs to the state through cannabis taxation, and you've ignored it. My question was, would you support legalisation if it was a net gain for the state, and you've refused to answer it or accept it as a valid question, despite experts in the subject claiming that it would provide multi-billion gains. I wonder why you're so reluctant to provide an answer?
Your research is a line from Wikipedia? Anyway, I've pointed out that a reasonable person could believe it is possible to cover health and social costs to the state through cannabis taxation, and you've ignored it. My question was, would you support legalisation if it was a net gain for the state, and you've refused to answer it or accept it as a valid question, despite experts in the subject claiming that it would provide multi-billion gains. I wonder why you're so reluctant to provide an answer? Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

8:13pm Sun 16 Dec 12

There Abouts says...

"Your research is a line from Wikipedia?" - No.

" Anyway, I've pointed out that a reasonable person could believe it is possible to cover health and social costs to the state through cannabis taxation" - you haven't, "and you've ignored it", I haven't.

"My question was, would you support legalisation if it was a net gain for the state, and you've refused to answer it or accept it as a valid question" - correct.

"despite experts in the subject claiming that it would provide multi-billion gains. I wonder why you're so reluctant to provide an answer?" - wonder no longer, it's because as I pointed with a quote from Wikipedia: "Both advocates and opponents of the drug are able to call upon numerous scientific studies supporting their respective positions", add to that economic, health and social studies. "Numerous" - a number that could never all be listed here.

As I said, do your research, which you haven't because it would take you weeks to come back with a fully informed reply. You could start with Google Scholar rather than NaturalNews.com or the Guardian.






Quote »| Report this post »






Quote »| Report this post »
"Your research is a line from Wikipedia?" - No. " Anyway, I've pointed out that a reasonable person could believe it is possible to cover health and social costs to the state through cannabis taxation" - you haven't, "and you've ignored it", I haven't. "My question was, would you support legalisation if it was a net gain for the state, and you've refused to answer it or accept it as a valid question" - correct. "despite experts in the subject claiming that it would provide multi-billion gains. I wonder why you're so reluctant to provide an answer?" - wonder no longer, it's because as I pointed with a quote from Wikipedia: "Both advocates and opponents of the drug are able to call upon numerous scientific studies supporting their respective positions", add to that economic, health and social studies. "Numerous" - a number that could never all be listed here. As I said, do your research, which you haven't because it would take you weeks to come back with a fully informed reply. You could start with Google Scholar rather than NaturalNews.com or the Guardian. Quote »| Report this post » Quote »| Report this post » There Abouts
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Sun 16 Dec 12

Pimpmasterkdogg says...

ok then, what's the answer?

point me to some studies that indicate legalisating cannabis would cause an economic burden and I'll read them. Otherwise, don't ignore my question and answer, 'if it was not a burden to the Exchequer, would you agree with legalisation?'

Poor show, honestly. You care enough about the issue to still be posting here, why not just answer my simple question? Also, link to one of the 'numerous' studies that points towards legalisation being an economic burden. I've done all the work here.
ok then, what's the answer? point me to some studies that indicate legalisating cannabis would cause an economic burden and I'll read them. Otherwise, don't ignore my question and answer, 'if it was not a burden to the Exchequer, would you agree with legalisation?' Poor show, honestly. You care enough about the issue to still be posting here, why not just answer my simple question? Also, link to one of the 'numerous' studies that points towards legalisation being an economic burden. I've done all the work here. Pimpmasterkdogg
  • Score: 0

5:11pm Mon 17 Dec 12

Treeman1963 says...

Both my sons suffer from chronic psychiatric problems as a result of smoking skunk. Just saying.
Both my sons suffer from chronic psychiatric problems as a result of smoking skunk. Just saying. Treeman1963
  • Score: 0

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